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monongahela
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 Posted: March 23rd, 2010 12:20 AM  Edit Post Delete post Back to top

My first personal research trip of 2010 turned out to be very successful, from an audio recording perspective. I've posted three pieces of the recordings I made the evening of March 20th.

The first is a couple of loud owl hoots that came in response to some vocals and wood knocks I had made. I respond to the hoots with one vocal bark and three rock clacks. I wood knock is audible at the 20 second mark:
http://sites.google.com/site/mongah...LPAM-Detail.mp3

Some time later, in the second recording, a series of whoops has started up on the hill above me. I can't hear the early whoops in this recording at the time, and only heard the loudest whoops at the very end of the recording as I sat by my campfire. The vocal at 1:19 is punctuated with a wood knock:
http://sites.google.com/site/mongah...LPAM-Detail.mp3

In the third recording the vocals have turned from whoops into downward "woos" and are farther away from camp. Again, only the loudest of these were audible at the time. Vocals at 0:23 and 0:25 seconds seem to be from two different speakers. A wood knock is audible at 0:26:
http://sites.google.com/site/mongah...LPAM-Detail.mp3

A trip report for this outing is posted at:
http://s2.excoboard.com/BFRO/124725...?page=2#6649668
(Edited by monongahela)
Monongahela | http://sasquatchbioacoustic.blogspot.com | Attended BFRO Tennessee 2010, Pennsylvania 2011, Ohio 2012, West Virginia 2012
 
 
Christopher Noel
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 Posted: March 23rd, 2010 10:32 AM  Edit Post Delete post Back to top

Thanks for posting, Mono! I love these vocals. I can't hear the wood knocks, though that's probably my middle-aged ears...
There are two possibilities, and two only. Either Sasquatch does not exist--in which case all of the thousands of sincere eye-witness accounts, as well as centuries of Native American wisdom, are false--or else it does exist, and if it does exist, it has survived alongside Homo sapiens only by being far more elusive than Homo sapiens can imagine.
 
 
The Unclad Simian
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 Posted: March 23rd, 2010 11:35 AM  Edit Post Delete post Back to top

Great work monongahela!

Another example of the importance of documentation with audio equipment that I hadn't realized-picking up sound that the unaided ear misses.

It makes sense though, as we age, we lose a bit of our hearing. Also I see technology making information available about types of sound inaccessible to the human ear as well.

Thank you, for sharing your hard work with us.



All peoples have always thought all other peoples to be both stupid and at a lower state of culture. This is both stupid and uncultured.
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monongahela
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 Posted: March 23rd, 2010 04:49 PM  Edit Post Delete post Back to top

Thanks Chris. The wood knocks can be hard to make out. They're often fainter, and sometimes quite similar to the vocals. And these recordings aren't exactly stellar. I'm going to try and bring out the vocals and knocks a little better, and suppress some more of the noise and hiss (although I hate to do too much alteration as some might claim I'm manipulating audio to present something that's not really there).

Unclad, thanks, and I'm glad I have something to contribute to the effort. My experiences of late are leading me to believe that the easiest/best chance for finding evidence of our friend in any given area is through audio monitoring. They seem to be very chatty fellows on most nights. And even with very good hearing, we seem to miss a lot of their conversation. But decent audio recording equipment (even low-end like I use) has the ability to pick up these sounds when they occur.
Monongahela | http://sasquatchbioacoustic.blogspot.com | Attended BFRO Tennessee 2010, Pennsylvania 2011, Ohio 2012, West Virginia 2012
 
 
narrowfoot
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 Posted: March 23rd, 2010 05:11 PM  Edit Post Delete post Back to top

This is very interesting. The two times I have heard what could have been a knock, it was rather quiet. I had expected louder sounds. Going through photos yesterday, I noticed what almost looks like a worn club leaning against a tree, surrounded by limbs that I've been thinking look somehow suspicious. I wonder whether that's a knocking tool. I need to go back and investigate that area again, and listen more carefully at night!
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joshua megyesy
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 Posted: March 23rd, 2010 08:57 PM  Edit Post Delete post Back to top

Do you mind me asking what kind of recording equipment you are using?
Great sounds.
Keep 'em coming.
joshua M.

Ignorance more frequently begets confidence than does knowledge: it is those who know little, and not those who know much, who so positively assert that this or that problem will never be solved by science. ~Charles Darwin
 
 
monongahela
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 Posted: March 23rd, 2010 09:29 PM  Edit Post Delete post Back to top

Actually I'm using a very affordable Olympus digital recorder, model WS311m (Ebay for $35):
http://www.olympusamerica.com/cpg_s...asp?fl=&id=1308

and an omni-direcetional stereo mic intended for pod casting from Giant Squid Audio Labs ($65, but occasionally on sale for $55):
http://www.giant-squid-audio-lab.co...ast_stereo.html

I wanted an entry level system to decide if I would enjoy this hobby, before I sunk a bunch of money into an expensive recorder. It seems to work pretty well. But I wouldn't recommend this model of Olympus recorder. There are newer ones, like the WS500, that have more capacity and are quieter, too.
Monongahela | http://sasquatchbioacoustic.blogspot.com | Attended BFRO Tennessee 2010, Pennsylvania 2011, Ohio 2012, West Virginia 2012
 
 
John_P
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 Posted: March 23rd, 2010 11:41 PM  Edit Post Delete post Back to top

In your report thread you state the Li-ion batteries died. My previous job involved solar powered gas well instrumentation. The lithium batteries failed miserably below freezing; the chemistry does not function then. A small gel lead-acid would be better. If the recorder has a car adapter you can use it for the lead-acid connection.
 
 
joshua megyesy
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 Posted: March 24th, 2010 11:33 AM  Edit Post Delete post Back to top

Thanks monongahela,
I'm also looking for an entry level system to cut my teeth on.

joshua M.

Ignorance more frequently begets confidence than does knowledge: it is those who know little, and not those who know much, who so positively assert that this or that problem will never be solved by science. ~Charles Darwin
 
 
monongahela
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 Posted: March 25th, 2010 10:30 PM  Edit Post Delete post Back to top

Quote:
Christopher Noel wrote:
Thanks for posting, Mono! I love these vocals. I can't hear the wood knocks, though that's probably my middle-aged ears...


Hey Chris, I went back to the first recording, the owl hoots, and brought up the volume on the single wood knock in that recording. It's at the 20 second mark, after my voice response, and before my rock clacks. Tell me if you can hear it now:
https://sites.google.com/site/monga...LPAM-Detail.mp3
Monongahela | http://sasquatchbioacoustic.blogspot.com | Attended BFRO Tennessee 2010, Pennsylvania 2011, Ohio 2012, West Virginia 2012
 
 
monongahela
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 Posted: March 25th, 2010 11:25 PM  Edit Post Delete post Back to top

In my trip report posted at the link up above, I mentioned hearing barks every once in a while as I hiked around in the daylight hours. I managed to isolate one of those barks, actually a double bark, from my recordings and wanted to share it as an example of what I kept hearing. The weird thing about these barks is how indistinct they were. I could never get a fix on where they originated from:
https://sites.google.com/site/monga...-DoubleBark.mp3
Monongahela | http://sasquatchbioacoustic.blogspot.com | Attended BFRO Tennessee 2010, Pennsylvania 2011, Ohio 2012, West Virginia 2012
 
 
Mega Monkey
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 Posted: March 26th, 2010 03:24 PM  Edit Post Delete post Back to top

Quote:
monongahela wrote:
In my trip report posted at the link up above, I mentioned hearing barks every once in a while as I hiked around in the daylight hours. I managed to isolate one of those barks, actually a double bark, from my recordings and wanted to share it as an example of what I kept hearing. The weird thing about these barks is how indistinct they were. I could never get a fix on where they originated from:
https://sites.google.com/site/monga...-DoubleBark.mp3


Sounds like a raven.
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Leatherneck
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 Posted: March 26th, 2010 03:36 PM  Edit Post Delete post Back to top

Mega Monkey,

A raven? It sounds to low to me for a raven.

Mark
Be especially watchful at night.
 
 
monongahela
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 Posted: March 26th, 2010 04:35 PM  Edit Post Delete post Back to top

I agree that it sounds somewhat like a raven on the recording, but this is fainter and not as clear as what I could hear in the field. Also the second note of this bark is louder and kind of growly, not something to common in a raven or crow caw. What I could hear with my ears was more dog-like than raven-like, too. I thought maybe a dog was lost in the woods, but I kept hearing the bark off and on for a couple three hours. Then later in the evening, when I started to hear the howls, the voice was very similar to the one behind this bark. Might not have been the same source, but I'm confident it wasn't a bird. Just too loud, and it followed me around as I hiked over 5 miles of trails that afternoon (also started just as soon as I began walking away from vehicle, almost like it could see me).

That's the real downside of audio recording. It can never capture the true essence of what's happening in the field. And studying audio can take a long while to develop an ear for. In the end you won't convince most people of anything with it. It's only folks who have spent a LOT of time listening to audio who might be persuaded by what they hear. And the art of "hearing" is always a subjective activity.

But for my purposes, I collect audio and study it in an attempt to identify hallmarks that exclude known sources. This recording certainly doesn't do that, but its an important one to me because of the context in which it was captured, and the events that I recorded in the evening hours immediately after this. In the future I will be paying attention to these dog like barks that I hear miles into the forest, away from civilization.
(Edited by monongahela)
Monongahela | http://sasquatchbioacoustic.blogspot.com | Attended BFRO Tennessee 2010, Pennsylvania 2011, Ohio 2012, West Virginia 2012
 
 
Mega Monkey
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 Posted: March 27th, 2010 10:49 AM  Edit Post Delete post Back to top

Quote:
monongahela wrote:

That's the real downside of audio recording. It can never capture the true essence of what's happening in the field. And studying audio can take a long while to develop an ear for. In the end you won't convince most people of anything with it. It's only folks who have spent a LOT of time listening to audio who might be persuaded by what they hear. And the art of "hearing" is always a subjective activity.



Exactly. Still, good job being out there and workin' with what you got! Thanks for sharing. I hope you keep it up.
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monongahela
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 Posted: March 27th, 2010 03:06 PM  Edit Post Delete post Back to top

Yeah, I should be at this for a while. It's one angle on sasquatch that only a few people are working, and even fewer are doing any careful analysis of the audio (Scott Nelson being one of those few). My goal is to help shed some light into this area and give folks an audio reference to look into. A lot of reports include the witness hearing some kind of vocalization (scream, chatter, roar, bark, unidentifiable, etc.). I hope to establish a catalog that folks can listen through, and hopefully find an example similar to what they heard.
Monongahela | http://sasquatchbioacoustic.blogspot.com | Attended BFRO Tennessee 2010, Pennsylvania 2011, Ohio 2012, West Virginia 2012
 
 
imonacan
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 Posted: March 28th, 2010 01:47 AM  Edit Post Delete post Back to top

I enjoyed reading your field report, mono.... and listening to the interesting audio. Keep up the good work, and thanks for sharing.
 
 
monongahela
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 Posted: March 28th, 2010 04:31 PM  Edit Post Delete post Back to top

Thanks imonacan.

And for those who are following this thread, I've just finished going through all of the audio from Recorder #1, my in-camp recorder, and pulling out all the highlights that I wanted to share. I've put a dozen new clips up on this page for folks to check out:
https://sites.google.com/site/monga...ecordings2010-1

Would love to hear opinions and feedback here on this thread.
Monongahela | http://sasquatchbioacoustic.blogspot.com | Attended BFRO Tennessee 2010, Pennsylvania 2011, Ohio 2012, West Virginia 2012
 
 
monongahela
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 Posted: March 29th, 2010 05:13 PM  Edit Post Delete post Back to top

Quote:
imonacan wrote:


I listened to your sound clips this morning, mono. IMO, you've got a Barred Owl nesting (or pre nexting) situation that you've picked up in the distance with the mics. I think this accounts for the strange chattering sounds, and maybe for the two note vocals. Here is a page I often use, that has some of the chatter vocals...in addition to many of the strange sounds these owls (or owlets) can produce:

http://www.owlcam.com/soundlib/sound_lib.htm

This is the file that I thought sounded similar to the chatter in your recorded file:

http://www.owlcam.com/soundlib/sounds1/chatter.wav

The two note woo calls have me wondering, and I couldn't possibly conclude if it was an owl imitator, or a strange variation, and an owl itself. The faint whoops sound lower pitched and different (to me) than any of the other calls, but would probably be too faint to do any spectral analyisis, on. The blunt knocks sure are not produced by any owl. The bark sounds more like a domestic dog, than a 'yote or fox. Wild, interbreeding coydogs could sound like this...but this is just another guess, on my part.
I think you've got a mixture of known woodland sounds (owl,and some form of dog), and unknowns (whoops, strange 2 notes, and knocks) going on. All this is just my opinion, and enjoyed listening to the clips. You've got something strange goings on there, that (like my own, and all of our research) will need more time in the field to begin to figure out what's happening. Kudos to you for braving the snow and getting in there early in the season.


Sorry, I just realized this reply should have been over on the the other thread, and maybe it could be moved...thanks


Imonacan,
Thought I'd answer your post over here so that we don't clutter up the main WV activity thread.

Thanks for the links to the chatters, that was handy. I'm still not convinced of what this might be, but one other thought did occur. This could be some type of small mammal(s), for instance a pair of skunks making a racket, I don't know.

When I study recordings like this I'm looking for characteristics that help push them beyond the realm of what can be created by humans or known creatures. Fortunately these recordings do have some attributes which helps me go beyond the conclusion that they are an owl, or a dog. And human is highly unlikely given the environment I recorded them in.

Wood knocks, especially when used as an integral part of the vocalization, are an important clue to distinguish these vocals from those of other animals. As we all know, owls and dogs don't have thumbs.

But in all fairness, I have more insight into these recordings than what's available in those snippets. There's a lot of additional audio that I can hear in my headphones, which isn't worth posting on the website. I also had a second recorder going in the next valley to the north which captured some great audio from these same vocalizers. Plus I've had an opportunity to listen to a LOT of audio from around the country over this past winter, and some common characteristics of potential sasquatch vocalizations are beginning to emerge (at least for me).

So that obviously all bears some backing up, and I do intend to share a slew of new clips from my other recorder within the next few days. But it will take some time for me to pull that together. What I hope to make plain with these additional out takes are the accidental "whoops" that slip into the dog-like vocals, the wood knocks that are synchronized with the exaggerated owl whoops, and the interaction between the "dog" and the "owl" that to my experience, just doesn't normally occur in nature (they seem to be traveling together in the recording).

Ultimately these recordings will be paired with several others I've received. Collectively they'll provide the basis of a theoretical discussion of the use of mimicry in sasquatch vocalizations.
Monongahela | http://sasquatchbioacoustic.blogspot.com | Attended BFRO Tennessee 2010, Pennsylvania 2011, Ohio 2012, West Virginia 2012
 
 
imonacan
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 Posted: March 30th, 2010 11:08 AM  Edit Post Delete post Back to top

Quote:
monongahela wrote

But in all fairness, I have more insight into these recordings than what's available in those snippets. There's a lot of additional audio that I can hear in my headphones, which isn't worth posting on the website. I also had a second recorder going in the next valley to the north which captured some great audio from these same vocalizers. Plus I've had an opportunity to listen to a LOT of audio from around the country over this past winter, and some common characteristics of potential sasquatch vocalizations are beginning to emerge (at least for me).

So that obviously all bears some backing up, and I do intend to share a slew of new clips from my other recorder within the next few days. But it will take some time for me to pull that together. What I hope to make plain with these additional out takes are the accidental "whoops" that slip into the dog-like vocals, the wood knocks that are synchronized with the exaggerated owl whoops, and the interaction between the "dog" and the "owl" that to my experience, just doesn't normally occur in nature (they seem to be traveling together in the recording).

Ultimately these recordings will be paired with several others I've received. Collectively they'll provide the basis of a theoretical discussion of the use of mimicry in sasquatch vocalizations.


Understood. There is no one that has better insight ,than the recordist that was researching at the scene. My opinion is only from a listener's standpoint. It's interesting that you've captured the interaction between the sounds, from another location and perspective. Putting out another recorder a distance away, was a good idea. I would agree that owls and dogs don't normally travel together in the forest. I'll look forward to hearing the clips, and discussing the theory based on recorded audio.... that squatch could very well be capable of mimic.
(Edited by imonacan)
 
 
monongahela
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 Posted: March 30th, 2010 02:18 PM  Edit Post Delete post Back to top

It turns out that placing the second recorder where I did may have been a stroke of great luck. Based on what I can hear in the "northern" recorder, it seems these vocalizers started their calls at about 9 p.m. in the next valley north from my location. Over time they climbed the ridge moving southward, toward my "in-camp" recorder. My in camp recorder first captured their vocals somewhere between 9:30 and 10 p.m. And both recorders have ongoing vocals for several hours (collectively) after that.

With time, I might be able to piece together a rough travel sequence showing the vocalizers moving north to south, topping the ridge (where they seem to be within range of BOTH recorders at the same time) and then moving east where only the southern recorder can pick them up. I could be working on this set of recordings for weeks or months to come.
(Edited by monongahela)
Monongahela | http://sasquatchbioacoustic.blogspot.com | Attended BFRO Tennessee 2010, Pennsylvania 2011, Ohio 2012, West Virginia 2012
 
 
Christopher Noel
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 Posted: March 30th, 2010 04:22 PM  Edit Post Delete post Back to top

Quote:
monongahela wrote:


Hey Chris, I went back to the first recording, the owl hoots, and brought up the volume on the single wood knock in that recording. It's at the 20 second mark, after my voice response, and before my rock clacks. Tell me if you can hear it now:
https://sites.google.com/site/monga...LPAM-Detail.mp3


I just hear a "huff," like breath.
There are two possibilities, and two only. Either Sasquatch does not exist--in which case all of the thousands of sincere eye-witness accounts, as well as centuries of Native American wisdom, are false--or else it does exist, and if it does exist, it has survived alongside Homo sapiens only by being far more elusive than Homo sapiens can imagine.
 
 
monongahela
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 Posted: March 30th, 2010 05:14 PM  Edit Post Delete post Back to top

Quote:
Christopher Noel wrote:


I just hear a "huff," like breath.


Well, you're certainly looking in the right place. That "huff" sound is actually the background noise where I try to amplify those couple of seconds in the audio. There is a soft thump right in the middle of that spike in the noise. I guess this is a good example of how difficult wood knocks at a distance can be to discern, as opposed to vocals.
Monongahela | http://sasquatchbioacoustic.blogspot.com | Attended BFRO Tennessee 2010, Pennsylvania 2011, Ohio 2012, West Virginia 2012
 
 
monongahela
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 Posted: April 6th, 2010 01:55 PM  Edit Post Delete post Back to top

Quote:
Mega Monkey wrote:


Sounds like a raven.


I forgot to mention, the double bark mentioned above was captured sometime after 10 PM. Not exactly prime time for raven vocals, which in this area are most frequent at sunrise and throughout the day light hours.

Not a silver bullet, but a useful data point.
Monongahela | http://sasquatchbioacoustic.blogspot.com | Attended BFRO Tennessee 2010, Pennsylvania 2011, Ohio 2012, West Virginia 2012
 
 
Mega Monkey
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 Posted: April 6th, 2010 03:12 PM  Edit Post Delete post Back to top

Quote:
monongahela wrote:


I forgot to mention, the double bark mentioned above was captured sometime after 10 PM. Not exactly prime time for raven vocals, which in this area are most frequent at sunrise and throughout the day light hours.

Not a silver bullet, but a useful data point.


That definitely makes a difference.
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monongahela
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 Posted: April 7th, 2010 11:08 PM  Edit Post Delete post Back to top

OK. I wanted to start a second thread, a "part 2" if you will, on the results of my first outing of the year on March, 20th. This distinction is useful because on that outing I had a second audio recorder rolling, and its results were better than my in-camp recorder on a phenomenal scale. While my in-camp audio recorder did capture some great vocals and wood knocks as discussed in this other thread: http://s2.excoboard.com/BFRO/115582/2177695 , the results from my remote recorder were so extensive that I didn't want to risk confusing the two, and have people thinking that I could actually hear all these other vocals from my campsite location, I couldn't (if I had I probably would have bugged out).

I've posted two dozen audio highlights from a recorder and parabolic microphone which was positioned to the northwest, on the back side of the ridge north of my camp, and in the direction of the original vocals I captured with the in-camp recorder. The access road to my campsite passed not far from where the parabolic was placed in the forest. And the parabolic was aimed northeast, to cover the flanks of the ridge between it and my camp, the floor of the valley below, and the flanks of a large ridge a half mile to the north.

The recordings from the remotely place parabolic are on the same page as the snippets from my in-camp recorder, and can be distinguished by their file names which begin with WS500* (the model of recorder in use). All the in-camp audio files from my earlier post begin with WS310* (*additional numbers deleted). And the link to the audio collection is:

UPDATED:
http://sites.google.com/site/mongah...ecordings2010-1

While each of the audio samples includes a brief descriptive text along with it, I'll offer here a few words on why I chose the audio samples that I did.

The first five audio snippets I thought notable because they demonstrate that wood knocks and vocals can occur during the day time. These were captured between 2:00PM and 8:00PM on March 20th. They also show potential for substantiating the hypothesis that wood knocks and vocals may serve to announce the arrival of a human on the scene. Notes next to each audio sample extend this speculation.

Beginning at 9:09 p.m. that evening, the parabolic began to pick up howls, bark, hoots, and much later, whoops, that grew in volume and intensity, before fading away to intermittent periods of quiet. This activity was most intense up until about 1 a.m. that night, but occasional outbursts of the same vocals were captured until as late as almost 5:00 a.m. on the 21st.

Early in the recordings, the vocals are very owl-like, or very dog-like. But the owl is noticeably loud, louder than other owl vocals captured that night. But as time goes by in the recordings, and as demonstrated in the audio samples, the hoots and barks tend to lose their form. By 9:30 the barks occasionally ascend in a slight whoop-like fashion. Not a clear whoop, but losing that canine sound. Also by 9:30, the first wood knocks begin to appear intermixed with the vocals.

There are a series of three or four key audio samples that are most noteworthy in this collection. One demonstrates an association between the bark vocals and wood knocks. Another demonstrates wood knocks associated with the loud owl hoots. Yet another key sample offers the first association of the hoot vocals and the bark vocals with each other (with wood knocks included). An important feature of this sample is the differing tone between the hoots and barks, indicating two different speakers are involved, and each making a unique type of vocal. This is demonstrated again in audio samples from later in the evening, and indicates that the two vocalizers were moving together over the course of the evening.

Based upon the substantiation established in those key samples described above, I carved out a few more interesting samples. Some are better versions of whoop-like barks. Some include faint whoops that you have to listen closely to hear. Some demonstrate a ululating form and other combine howls, whoops, barks and wood knocks all in one segment. And the owl hoots become noticeably absent in some of the later samples. They seem to have been replaced with howl-like vocals.

And at the end of the collection I added a very unique vocal, unlike any I've ever heard before. It's a higher pitched voice, possibly not one of the two speakers described above, and it lets out a short wailing call that sounds to me like "wahoo". It could be an owl call, but I've never heard an owl make a call like that. However it is unusual and I share it for your enjoyment.

Please feel free to share your opinions, good, bad or indifferent. I know some folks won't hear what I or others hear, and that's ok. I want to get all the opinions and angles I can and make this a useful conversation.

(Edited by monongahela)
Monongahela | http://sasquatchbioacoustic.blogspot.com | Attended BFRO Tennessee 2010, Pennsylvania 2011, Ohio 2012, West Virginia 2012
 
 
PBYodeler
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 Posted: April 8th, 2010 03:05 AM  Edit Post Delete post Back to top

We need a proper link to the recordings. That one just takes us to the other thread

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monongahela
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 Posted: April 8th, 2010 07:59 AM  Edit Post Delete post Back to top

Thanks PBY. I had the wrong link in my paste buffer. I've updated the post with the correct link and here it is again, for good measure:
http://sites.google.com/site/mongah...ecordings2010-1
Monongahela | http://sasquatchbioacoustic.blogspot.com | Attended BFRO Tennessee 2010, Pennsylvania 2011, Ohio 2012, West Virginia 2012
 
 
Mega Monkey
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 Posted: April 8th, 2010 02:29 PM  Edit Post Delete post Back to top

I would like to hear what an owl "expert" would have to say about these.
Especially about what is heard at the 00:51 mark of the 9:09 PM recording.
I don't have an expert level of understanding of owls, but I have learned the past few years that they are capable of an amazing amount of varied sounds and some of them can be pretty damn unnerving if they catch you off guard.
With that being said, I also do not know what a squatch is capable of, or willing to do in reguards to sound. You are hearing knocks with the hoots. As far as I know, owls hoot but they don't do wood knocks.
I wish the recordings were clearer. The 9:09 and 9:13 recordings seem to be the most suspect to me.
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monongahela
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 Posted: April 8th, 2010 06:34 PM  Edit Post Delete post Back to top

Good point MM, and I've been running vocals like this past owling forums for their opinion. I've learned that my research area has three predominant species or owl, the Great Horned Owl, the Barred Owl, and the Screech Owl. It was suggested this sounded most like a Great Horned Owl, but GHOs are normally a softer, mellower note (not so loud or forceful) and they typically come in threes (vice the singles that I kept recording). But that's an angle I'm always working, what known animal could be making this sound. Also, what is unique about this sound that pushes it beyond the typical animal or human generated vocal.

The wood knocks are a really important hallmark in my opinion. Their association with vocals dramatically narrows the potential number of sources for the vocal (assuming misinterpretation isn't in play). And vice verse, wood knocks without vocals can be generated by a number of things, and not every knock in the woods is squatch originated.

I too wish these recordings were better. I listened to them from my office computer today and was really disappointed with how they sound. I have average speakers on my work computer and I'm sure they're a better representation of what many people use to listen to these files. I on the other hand normally use some good Bose headphones while I analyze and review these recordings. It makes a huge difference.

So truth be told, these aren't consumer grade recordings that I have to share, but for the earnest researcher they do provide some invaluable data. You just have to be willing to put on the head phones, and listen to the files several dozen times over. That's probably the only way to really start hearing the nuances of these and other vocals.

On the bright side, I'm upgrading my recording equipment before I go back out in the field. Hopefully my beginner's luck won't run out any time soon and my improved equipment will capture some vocals that everyone can easily appreciate.
Monongahela | http://sasquatchbioacoustic.blogspot.com | Attended BFRO Tennessee 2010, Pennsylvania 2011, Ohio 2012, West Virginia 2012
 
 




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