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How was Florida 2008?
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BethinFL
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 Posted: February 18th, 2008 12:00 PM  Edit Post Delete post Back to top

I will patiently wait for expedition notes to be posted. I hope everybody had a good time. The weather this weekend down here was gorgeous, but there was a lot of rain last week. I hope it didn't ruin anybody's experience.
 
 
zachi
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 Posted: February 21st, 2008 08:29 AM  Edit Post Delete post Back to top

Hi,
I was on the Fl expedition. We had a wonderful time and the weather was wonderful. There had been a tornado and 8" of rain 2 days before the start date. We found that many of the trails were flooded. I had to leave a little early but we did hear howls the first night. I am also waiting to hear what happened the last night of the trip.
 
 
snookman
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 Posted: February 21st, 2008 09:51 AM  Edit Post Delete post Back to top

Two inches of rain in that area is pretty substancial! I hope it didn't block off too much area for the night patrols. Any class A's or B's on the trip?
 
 
BethinFL
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 Posted: February 21st, 2008 10:38 AM  Edit Post Delete post Back to top

I'm so glad to hear the weather straightened out in time! Yea! I was wondering. Can't really complain about the rain because it has been so..... dry down here. Still though, I felt bad about the possibility of the expedition getting flooded out. That is so cool that you guys heard some howls!
 
 
zachi
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 Posted: February 22nd, 2008 12:29 PM  Edit Post Delete post Back to top

The water was a problem. The only group that got really far off road took a land rover. There were lots of "puddles" and it was totally underwater for at least 500 ft. We had thermal imaging, night vision, and bionic ear, but didn't see or hear anything. There were a lot of trails that looked promising, then disappeared under water.
 
 
dtart12
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 Posted: February 22nd, 2008 04:18 PM  Edit Post Delete post Back to top

There was two possible sightings with thermal imaging devices. My partner saw a rocking type motion of what we beleive to be a Squatch in between us and main team which had left the trail and returned to the vehicles. Senior tracker had alerted us to small knock and then we had our encounter followed by breakdown in communications between the two parties radios. Very interesting. Several howls were heard, couple of wood knocks noted as well. Several tracks and sign were found by scouting parties. All in all we had a great expedition . Good team.
DTart
NC/SC BFRO Investigator
SE BFRO TRACKER
 
 
AlanF
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 Posted: February 22nd, 2008 09:23 PM  Edit Post Delete post Back to top

My first expedition and one of my biggest thrills was also hearing the knock that DTART mentioned above. Radios didn't work as well as they could have but the vegetation was just so thick in areas. I think by the end of the trip we had narrowed down this vast area to two very good areas for further investigation. Lots of great people and great times if you've never gone on an expedition what are you waiting for?
I was in the main party headed back to the road if it was a squatch they saw we walked right by it and never saw, smelled or heard a thing. On that part of the trail the plants close in on you on both sides you could hide a tank right off the trail and never know its there.
Alan F.


True Insanity is to do what you've always done then expect a different result.
 
 
CurtS
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 Posted: March 10th, 2008 04:11 PM  Edit Post Delete post Back to top

Any news on the florida 2008 exp yet ? I live in florida and as a longtime hunter have heard many unexplainable noises. And would like some kind of input.
 
 
PBYodeler
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 Posted: March 10th, 2008 04:35 PM  Edit Post Delete post Back to top

CurtS

Could you please go to the "READ THIS FIRST" section on the forum home page and give us an introduction?

As for the 2008 Florida expedition you have to read the previous posts. That's what they're talking about.
PBYodeler
 
 
Armydude
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 Posted: March 11th, 2008 02:00 AM  Edit Post Delete post Back to top

All the Squatches were in Plant City for the strawberry festival - Does anyone know if there are more or less sightings in rain conditions?
Expeditions 2008

"I have seen enough evidence to believe."
 
 
BethinFL
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 Posted: March 11th, 2008 11:48 AM  Edit Post Delete post Back to top

I went to the Strawberry Festival, but I didn't see any Squatches! Darn it. That is a very good question though. I've wondered about that too. In the summer, during the "rainy season" it doesn't just rain, it pours. It's been strange lately because last summer was very dry, and this winter we've had a lot of rain. I had asked a question similar to this, but I had directed it more toward snow storms. If BF somehow senses the weather and gets more active right before and then hunkers down, but I'm sure the same could also be applied to rain. I've never had any sightings, but my eyes and ears are open now.
 
 
AlanF
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 Posted: March 12th, 2008 06:13 PM  Edit Post Delete post Back to top

Animals are sensitive to changes in barometric pressure and squatch is an animal. Most animals find shelter or hunker down before and during bad weather I expect squatch is the same. On the positive side they become more active when the weather clears. There are places quite near Plant City you shouldn't have to look to hard.
Alan F.


True Insanity is to do what you've always done then expect a different result.
 
 
boapaul
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 Posted: March 14th, 2008 07:57 AM  Edit Post Delete post Back to top

Plant city is right next door to me. (Tampa) I just moved here from Arkansas and am looking for good places to look. Somebody email me with some good spots to go to. I've looked through the reports and have a general ideal were to look, but need a little push in the right direction. boapaul@gmail.com
Paul Petz 13 bravo- Army
 
 
body_guard4
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 Posted: March 14th, 2008 08:13 AM  Edit Post Delete post Back to top

Paul, my father lives by midleburg and has heard about reports near there.
 
 
MikeSquatch
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 Posted: March 14th, 2008 02:09 PM  Edit Post Delete post Back to top

Quote:
boapaul wrote:
Plant city is right next door to me. (Tampa) I just moved here from Arkansas and am looking for good places to look. Somebody email me with some good spots to go to. I've looked through the reports and have a general ideal were to look, but need a little push in the right direction. boapaul@gmail.com



Good luck with that Boapaul, I was shot down immediatly when I asked. I'm in Valrico, work in Tampa.
 
 
AlanF
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 Posted: March 15th, 2008 04:23 PM  Edit Post Delete post Back to top

It's always a kick when someone finds evidence of the animals being in area previously not looked at. They aren't dumb and the less an area is examined the better it is for them to be there. Two good things make great habitat I think. One is water they move through it, they move along it and they get food from it. Second is a healthy deer population. I don't see anyone finding good territory here in Florida without those two things being part of it.
Alan F.


True Insanity is to do what you've always done then expect a different result.
 
 
boapaul
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 Posted: March 19th, 2008 08:56 AM  Edit Post Delete post Back to top

Alan thanks for the little push. Made a little trip and looked around. I think I'll try the canoe on my next trip in there.
Paul Petz 13 bravo- Army
 
 
joeecuva
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 Posted: April 28th, 2008 12:07 AM  Edit Post Delete post Back to top

Quote:
CurtS wrote:
Any news on the florida 2008 exp yet ? I live in florida and as a longtime hunter have heard many unexplainable noises. And would like some kind of input.

Curts--Where do you hunt at? I live near Green Swamp Management area.
Joee
 
 
Navigator
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 Posted: April 30th, 2008 07:08 PM  Edit Post Delete post Back to top

February 2008 South Florida Expedition report:

The number of participants was restricted to 25. There were roughly equal numbers of experienced people and newbies. That ratio worked out well for showing the new people the ropes.

This expedition was organized by Florida BFRO Organizer, Caroline Curtis (Florida@BFRO.net). Attendees came from Georgia, Connecticut, Michigan, California, North Carolina and South Carolina, and from several parts of Florida.

Incident tally:

4 Class B audible
1 Class B visual
1 Possible track find


Informal Conclusions: There are sasquatches in southwest Florida, but they are probably less abundant in southwest Florida than in other parts of North America, and less abundant than in certain other parts of Florida.

Some speculation at play prior to the expedition:

The abundance of sasquatches in a region is partly a function of the amount of yearly rainfall, or more directly a function of protein supply (animal protein and plant protein). The protein supply is largely contingent upon the amount of rainfall.
Areas with little rain will have fewer animals and plants than areas receiving an abundance of rain consistently every year.

There is more native animal protein in southwest Florida than any other part of the country, if one factors in amphibians, reptiles, birds and fish, but there are fewer mammals in this region. The population of deer and wild pig is lower in southwest Florida than in several other parts of North America. So animal protein is higher, in general, but it is not from mammals.

Swampy riparian habitats give rise to an abundance and variety of animal protein. In the vast cypress swamps of southwest Florida there is an abundance of birds, fish, frogs, snakes and alligators, year round. But much of southwest Florida is slightly submerged most the year, which reduces the type of habitat favored by large prey *mammals*.

The common large prey mammals are all "ungulates" (animals with hoofs) which forage in fields for grasses, acorns, etc. -- mostly non-aquatic plants.

If sasquatches could survive and prosper on large reptiles such as snakes and alligators, then places like southwest Florida should hold more sasquatches than anywhere else. This does not seem to be the case.

There were a handful of incidents on the expedition with multiple observers present -- incidents which strongly indicated presence of sasquatches at those locations. The indicators were compelling, but they were relatively sparse, compared to many other zones in the country with large populations of deer, elk, or pigs, or some combinations thereof.

There were multiple witnesses for each of the four Class B audible incidents. Two incidents occurred on Saturday night, in roughly the same time frame, but at least 15 miles apart. One of those incidents involved an approach to two participants, and a "grand slam" knock from a distance of less than 100 feet, from the opposite side of a canal.

We got the tip about that location from a friendly local law enforcement officer who pulled over one of our vehicles on a highway. After he questioned us about our gear and activities he called over another officer to the scene. The other officer knew more about local "skunk-ape" sightings and he directed us to a place where several incidents supposedly occurred, near a picnic area on a long deserted road through some remote swamps and prairies.

The road has an official name, but we'll refer to it as "Long Road". When we were told about this location by the officer there was an implied understanding that we would not cause his department any problems, which would naturally include worries about what might happen if we disclosed his info on the Internet.

The Long Road area was not on our list of targets prior to this point, but it had a similar combination of thick cypress swamp and grassy savanna, so we went there immediately after our unexpected conversation with the law enforcement officers.

We didn't see or hear anything significant there that first night. All we did was drive the road with nightvision and thermal viewers. We did nothing to encourage sasquatches to respond and/or to approach.

On the following night the expeditioners split up into a few smaller groups. Two people went back to Long Road. They knocked and whooped around midnight near the picnic area mentioned by the local law enforcement officers. They did this for about a half hour, and they eventually got a close-range "grand slam" knock response. One of these participants was FL investigator Kevin Smykal, the other was Alan R., a sheriff from a different jurisdiction in Florida. The two of them were very excited when they phoned the camp to describe what happened. They had no doubts about it, and they said it seemed to confirm the "Castle and Moat" scenario.

The "Castle and Moat" scenario is one where sasquatches are able to approach and observe human activity, at places like picnic areas and campgrounds, where people will frequently be eating and/or playing. Sasquatches apparently like to observe humans, if they can do so safely, and unseen, from the other side of impassible barrier.

The impassible barrier at the Long Road location is the shrouded canal bordering the road. The canal is man-made, but it has very dense brush and trees on both sides, some of which clog the canal itself. The canal is full of dangerously sharp submerged boulders, and filled with strange looking fish, some the size of small sharks, numerous poisonous, fast-moving snakes, and well-concealed large alligators.

The Threat of Dogs

If you lived like a nomadic caveman, and you wanted to safely spy on picnicking humans from fairly close range, there would be certain obvious worries. One very real worry would be dogs running off the leash. Humans occasionally bring dogs to picnic areas like these and let them run off the leash. Dogs have a superior sense of smell and hearing. They are very alert to any animals moving in brush. Something with the intelligence of a nomadic caveman, subsisting on the fringes of human civilization, would be cognizant of dogs' propensity to chase an animal in the brush, or at least bark at it from a distance.

No dogs would even think about crossing this particular canal, especially near picnic area. One expeditioner found an apparent crossing point at a break in the brush. He managed to swim across it very carefully, with the help of a small raft. He made it across, and up onto the unseen prairie on the other side, but he came very close to a large alligator nest in the process. It was too risky to do this repeatedly.

The canal was the "moat" in this case. The shrouded area on the other side of the canal was the "castle". The castle was not a limited island, like a regular castle. It could not be surrounded. It was the border of a huge wild expanse that extended to the Gulf of Mexico with no bisecting roads.

We've seen different versions of this same terrain equation in other parts of the country, where repeated incidents have been reported. In some cases the "moat" will be a steep rock face that dogs cannot climb, and the "castle" will be a shrouded ridge above the rock face, providing a view of the human-accessible area below.

In other cases the moat will be an uncrossable fast-moving creek, or a steep chasm. The castle will be a shrouded slope on the other side, providing a safe, commanding view over the area used by visiting humans.

----------------------

The next night was Sunday night. Sunday was the last day of the scheduled trip, so most people had already left for home. We went back to Long Road picnic area with eight people and six thermals cameras.

Two of the thermals were vehicle-roof mounted and were continuously rolling video. Of the four hand-held thermals, two were accompanied by camcorders that could be quickly connected if something significant was spotted. Those units were not rolling video continuously because the viewfinder on them is automatically disabled when the device is connected to a recorder (a camcorder in our case). That means the unit must be aimed by looking at the LCD screen on the connected camcorder, as opposed to looking through the viewfinder of the thermal itself. It is very difficult to do this while walking, and it actually decreases the odds for spotting a sasquatch because the user will not be looking all around themselves while walking -- not as much as they will look around if they can simply aim and look through a single device.

We knocked and whooped for about a half hour before someone heard a response howl. Several minutes later Caroline (using a handheld thermal) spotted a large upright figure walking away from us across a savanna-marsh. It was out of view by the time the roof-mounted thermals made it over to that spot, so we didn't get it recorded. Like the sheriff-participant who heard the "grand slam" knock there the night before, Caroline was very adamant about what she observed in the thermal viewer.


The other Class B incidents:

On Friday night, several miles west from the Long Road location, a series of impressive "Ohio howls" were heard responding to our simulated vocals. The howls were emanating from a non-submerged zone in the heart of the Big Cypress National Preserve.

Normally we do not specify locations where relevant incidents occurred, as mentioned above, so as not to burden the local authorities with more concerns. We also hold back specifics to prevent over-eager individuals from putting too much pressure on wildlife in specific areas. That is not a concern for this particular location, because the area is so difficult to access by humans, etc.
Ninety-nine percent of people will only be able to see it from the distant perimeter.

Unlike the spot suggested by the law enforcement officers, we found this one on our own after scouting the general area by helicopter the day before most expeditioners arrived.

Two participants of the expedition had both the special permits and the proper vehicles to penetrate into the heart of the Big Cypress National Preserve. They spent one day deep in the Preserve, on the day after the moaning "Ohio howls" were heard. When they returned at the end of the day they said it was like another world in there, with hammocks of towering hardwood trees among giant cypress -- all old growth.

There was no way to bring all the expeditioners into this area, given the time constraints, so we opted for other areas that were more accessible -- areas where we thought their pathways might cross roads or trails that we could access quickly and easily. The other Class B incidents happened in one such area. Several people heard a distant but distinct knock response. That location was further west, but will not be named because it is relatively accessible by vehicles.

Southwest Florida has apparently been habitat for sasquatches for many years. There is some indication of this in nearby Everglades City. Inside the oldest restaurant in Everglades City there is a wall just inside the front entrance that is covered with old newspaper clippings about the town and surrounding area. A few of the articles talk about "skunk ape" sightings. One of the articles both talks about the incidents, and shows a map where incidents have been reported. It does not show precise locations, but instead shows skunk-ape icons in the general areas. To our amazement, the position of these skunk-ape icons actually overlaid two of the three zones where the incidents described above occurred.

A connection with other parts of the U.S.:

Many sightings and track finds, etc., have occurred near some of the National Scenic Trails, like the Continental Divide Trail, the Pacific Crest Trail and the Appalachian Trail.

Sasquatches are very observant. They would have noticed "thru-hikers" backpacking along these trails. They would have figured out that these trails carefully avoid human civilization, except where they cross *under* busy highways.

Not all, but many of the reports in Florida in the past few decades have occurred within a few miles of the Florida Trail system. Our most eventful excursions in Florida, which have taken place in different parts of the state, have occurred within a few miles of some portion of the Florida Trail system.

The Florida Trail system extends from the Big Cypress Preserve, then splits into two separate courses through the wild core of Central Florida, and continues through the Florida panhandle all the way to the Alabama border.

There will be an expedition in North Florida (Panhandle) in late October. If you are interested in attending this expedition please send an email explaining your interest to Florida@BFRO.net
 
 
Bob Naranja
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 Posted: June 4th, 2008 09:58 AM  Edit Post Delete post Back to top

Quality Summary, thanks Navigator..
"Bigfoots are so rare that Bigfoot Researchers don't have much else to do other than study each other." Source Unknown
 
 
jude
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 Posted: June 4th, 2008 11:06 AM  Edit Post Delete post Back to top

Quote:
Bob Naranja wrote:
Quality Summary, thanks Navigator.


Sets the bar, doesn't it?
Maine Expedition 08

"[A]t the heart of science is an essential balance between two seemingly contradictory attitudes--an openness to new ideas, no matter how bizarre or counterintuitive, and the most ruthlessly skeptical scrutiny of all ideas, old and new. This is how deep truths are winnowed from deep nonsense. The collective enterprise of creative thinking and skeptical thinking, working together, keeps the field on track."
-- Carl Sagan in The Demon-Haunted World
 
 
TRUTH-SEEKER
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 Posted: June 4th, 2008 01:01 PM  Edit Post Delete post Back to top

Excellent report Navigator. Very detailed. Great job thanks!!!!
"He who seeketh long enough and hard enough will find the truth, whatever that truth may be." Roger Patterson
“When you realize the value of a life, you dwell less on what is past and concentrate on the preservation of the future.” Diane Fossey

Squatch Researcher...
Expeditions Attended:
2008, 2009 Washington Cascades
2008, 2009 Wa. Olympic Peninsula
2010 Oregon
 
 




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