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littletoes
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 Posted: April 10th, 2013 12:27 AM  Edit Post Delete post Back to top

Ever think, if an area could support a large bear population, shouldn't it be able to also carry a population of large omnivores of other types? And if similar animals eat the same items, wouldn't/couldn't their scat be very similar? To the point of how could you tell it apart?

I've spent quite a bit of time in the woods, and depending what is being eaten, you will definitely see differing forms of scat, that is/could be from the same animals. Its always been a key for me. See whats in the scat, you know where the animal has been hanging out.

When scouting, I always check out watering holes....tracks are always easy to see in the mud. A good key to bear populations that is, or any other large (or small!), animals that is.

Ideas?
Portate bien o te lleva el cucuy<br />
 
 
Big Jim Jr
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 Posted: May 4th, 2013 11:53 AM  Edit Post Delete post Back to top

Reports of sightings of bigfoot seem to follow river valleys or creek bottom. There is a very easy to see pattern of sightings on the earth overlay the BFRO has. Another pattern I found was most sightings occur around the New moon followed closely by Full moon. I pulled reports with exact dates given from the BFRO database for WA. Then looked up moon phase for the date. Part of what makes me think there is something out there is the ability to see patterns in the reports. If the reports were all or mostly hoaxes, the patterns would be very loosely spread or non existent.
 
 
Simplicity
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 Posted: May 15th, 2013 05:18 PM  Edit Post Delete post Back to top

With regards to moon cycles Jim, I've looked at over 200 WA only sightings and there is no particular phase that stands out over any others, not as yet anyway.

I obviously still have a lot more to look at.

With regards to Bear population, I know the Quinault Reservation has one of the most dense and highest populations in the lower 48.
I have a feeling something BIG is gonna happen withn the world of the Big Guy soon.. Just a hunch of course..
 
 
Simplicity
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 Posted: May 15th, 2013 05:23 PM  Edit Post Delete post Back to top

To be accurate Jim, I've looked at 238 sighting in WA so far and out of 100% obviously, total waning crescent was the most popular moon phase but in only 17% of sightings, next was total waxing gibbous with 16%.

Full moon was at 11% of the 238 I've looked at so far.
I have a feeling something BIG is gonna happen withn the world of the Big Guy soon.. Just a hunch of course..
 
 
littletoes
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 Posted: June 18th, 2013 09:48 PM  Edit Post Delete post Back to top

River bottoms, depending upon the area, will have more Forbes, perhaps more edible plants also. Although it may be harder to travel closer to rivers, due to their location in deep canyons.

Perhaps there are more sightings in those areas, because there are more people in those areas. Nobody is going to see them-who isn't there.

I think the number one thing I would look at, human patterns....that might give a huge awakening as to why sightings are occurring in certain areas.

Keep up the research! The info is helping.
Portate bien o te lleva el cucuy<br />
 
 
littletoes
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 Posted: September 22nd, 2013 11:01 PM  Edit Post Delete post Back to top

All right folks, those that know me, know I like to get out in the deep woods and chase bear around a bit. Today, after church, me and three of my kids were out, getting rained on a bit, and two of us saw this track.

We were finding trees opened up by bears, and the bark tore off several (you could see the claw marks), and I came upon this track.

I can't say what it is, its too blury, took the picture with my cell phone. Sure doesn't look like a bear track, or if it is, its the biggest bear track I've ever seen. I wear a size 11 shoe.

There is extremely little exposed ground in this area. It is mostly downed, rotting trees. Hence the reason the bears like it so much-tons of grubs.

http://i15.photobucket.com/albums/a369/LitoD/0922131531_zps3d3dbd65.jpg

Here is a picture looking off down the hill. You'll notice not a single stump anywhere around. This area is protected from logging, but there isn't much standing timber any way. Lots of downed stuff. This picture doesn't show how the edge of the hill falls off after a bit. Quite steep in fact.
http://i15.photobucket.com/albums/a369/LitoD/0922131540_zpsdace6cb0.jpg

(Edited by Bossburg)
Portate bien o te lleva el cucuy<br />
 
 
Simplicity
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 Posted: September 26th, 2013 06:50 PM  Edit Post Delete post Back to top

Was this down in OR where you are now little toes ?
I have a feeling something BIG is gonna happen withn the world of the Big Guy soon.. Just a hunch of course..
 
 
littletoes
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 Posted: September 28th, 2013 03:22 PM  Edit Post Delete post Back to top

No, it is actually in NE Washington, where I live. Actually, its quite a bit north of my home.

What made you think I was in Oregon? Curious is all.
Portate bien o te lleva el cucuy<br />
 
 
Simplicity
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 Posted: November 18th, 2013 07:07 PM  Edit Post Delete post Back to top

I can't remember now.
I have a feeling something BIG is gonna happen withn the world of the Big Guy soon.. Just a hunch of course..
 
 




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