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November 19th, 2009 12:29 AM
bbwena In the book, Impossible Visits, they also mention that their "friends" created woven stick structures to use to as cover while they observed the humans at a habituation site. Despite their semi-trusting attitude toward some humans, they still seem to prefer to remain concealed. (And I certainly don't blame them)
November 19th, 2009 05:21 PM
toejam
Quote:
narrowfoot wrote:
I live in Wisconsin. You can see Michigan from parts of it, to coin a phrase. I also have not seen evidence in the winter. No footprints in spite of lots of snow last winter. But some good tracks were found an hour or so to the south.

A correspondent suggests that tree structures he's found that look pretty similar to your open one are blinds or observation points. He may well be right. Mothers like me tend to think of shelter before hunting and guarding! In my area, cedar thickets would serve either purpose extremely well, which may explain the absence of such structures. In my pictures, however, one structure does look like a teepee from the road, though it's an open tent shape when viewed from a more protected area. So perhaps there is a knowledge of constructed blinds.
(Edited by narrowfoot)


The latest structure that I found was right beside a trail so as far as being a blind, I don't think so. For all I know it could have been done by a person. Most things that I do find tend to be close to or beside trails. Where the latest one was found is a well used path but I already know it means nothing that people are around. Squatchy doesn't seem to care. Personally I think they like to watch us from their hiding places.
November 19th, 2009 05:39 PM
toejam
Quote:
bbwena wrote:
In the book, Impossible Visits, they also mention that their "friends" created woven stick structures to use to as cover while they observed the humans at a habituation site. Despite their semi-trusting attitude toward some humans, they still seem to prefer to remain concealed. (And I certainly don't blame them)


I've watched the video a couple times and yes I think the same thing. They like to watch us but definitely don't want us to see them. I had my own experience that told me they were watching and know who I am. I always give a sequential wood knock that's always the same (I knock in the same whoop sequence that I heard) I got out of my car one day, walked around to the other side and got the same wood knock I always give them as I passed the front of my car. I hadn't knocked yet or done anything to let them know I was there. I thought they must be watching. It was a great experience. Put a smile on my face :D
November 20th, 2009 12:20 AM
narrowfoot Toejam, I like the wood knock experience! Sounds like a special greeting for you. As for observing, the first pictures you posted show an open structure on what appears to be a high ridge overlooking steep drop offs and valleys. That would make it a good observation post and possibly a hunting blind, even though you say there's a trail beside it.
November 20th, 2009 06:29 PM
toejam
Quote:
narrowfoot wrote:
Toejam, I like the wood knock experience! Sounds like a special greeting for you. As for observing, the first pictures you posted show an open structure on what appears to be a high ridge overlooking steep drop offs and valleys. That would make it a good observation post and possibly a hunting blind, even though you say there's a trail beside it.


I hope it was a special greeting. That would make the hundreds of spent hours searching well worth it! Yes there is a ridge there overlooking a steep drop off. I'm back in there tomorrow hanging bait and hoping for some action. Another vocal encounter would make my day :D I'll be looking for more structures as well. I recall a big one that I haven't photographed yet. I'll check it out and post pics if it's what I think it is.
November 22nd, 2009 08:38 PM
narrowfoot What did you find, toejam?
November 22nd, 2009 10:47 PM
toejam I was in there for 5+ hours yesterday. Had a couple strange instances but not enough for me to think squatchy was watching. I realized the other structure I was referring to was in another location away from this area. Bit of a brain fart :D We did hear a tree fall over but that could have been natural of course although it did catch our attention. I did however pick this up on the way home.
http://www.videomaker.com/article/8666/
A solid piece of gear with night vision. I'm looking forward to using it. It'd sure be nice to get a close approach in the dark with the new gear. I highly recommend this camera. I'll be back in there next weekend.
November 23rd, 2009 12:02 PM
narrowfoot Looks like a very good camera.
November 23rd, 2009 07:09 PM
toejam Another thing I forgot to mention. There's a corn field bordering one of the areas and near the tree line there's a tree that sits amongst the corn. We found a bunch of husks and eaten cobs scattered underneath the tree. I would think if any other animal was eating the corn, it would do it where the corn had felled, not taking it to eat underneath the tree. It was an odd find.
November 23rd, 2009 10:29 PM
narrowfoot I have seen a squirrel carry an ear of corn quite a long way, probably to a nest. Lots of animals would be able to carry corn, but how many of them would do so I don't know. That's an interesting feeding area.
December 1st, 2009 10:20 AM
narrowfoot This message is posted just to straighten out the name and date on the menu listing. It's been wrong for several days.
December 1st, 2009 01:16 PM
monongahela Yeah, I've noticed that happens from time to time. Some kind of glitch in the phpBB forum software.
December 29th, 2009 12:41 AM
narrowfoot I have just edited the year on each of my photos posted on flickr. The dates are now accurate. The time, however, was 12 hours off on the camera, and I have not corrected it on the photos. If the time matters, add twelve hours. The photos are at

http://www.flickr.com/photos/digitaluser/sets/72157622318831057/
(Edited by narrowfoot)
January 6th, 2010 09:23 PM
narrowfoot For some time, since my observation area lies in a harsh climate, I have debated posting photos of tree breaks. There are several within the half mile in which my previously posted tree structures are found. Because there has been considerable discussion about tree breaks on these forums, I have decided to post a set of tree break pictures on flickr.com:

http://www.flickr.com/photos/digitaluser/sets/72157623031433319/

Tree structures as I have defined them involve construction - putting things together to form a whole, or anchoring limbs in such a way that maneuvering them was necessary. The double tree break I discovered this past fall fits that definition. The others do not. But trees downed by age and weather seem to break at the base. These are all broken somewhere in the middle of their trunks, and it appears that considerable force was needed to break them.

The first picture shows a path that leads from several of the tree structures I posted before toward the big double tree break, which is shown in the next three pictures. This trail is probably used by the resident foxes, but sticks are placed across it at regular intervals. I tripped over one of those sticks before I saw them.

Note that the trunks of the trees in the high double tree break cross each other, which is why I consider this a tree structure. The longest tree points to a hollow under a rotting fallen log (fifth picture). A picture of a similar, larger hollow was posted by monongahela above.

The fourth picture in the row gives an idea of the difficulty of reaching this tree break, which is well protected by underbrush (and poison ivy) on one side and by a stone wall above a low cliff on the other. The double tree break is in the most inaccessible part of the woods. It has obviously been there for some years, given its weathered appearance.

The next tree break is adjacent to a complicated, interwoven structure that I have never been able to photograph adequately. This break is also old and it is not very high.

On the second line, the first picture shows an old tree break that fell away from the adjacent road. So, down the road a bit, did the very high (way over my head), recent tree break in the next three pictures. In this case, the long tree points to a pine thicket where a flock of turkeys hang out. Across the road from that thicket, the turkeys are fed by a couple of homeowners. The pine thicket has grown into a good hiding place.

This big tree fell this past fall, after but apparently not during heavy winds. Again, it fell away from the road, which would have been blocked had it fallen the other way. Obviously, the tree had been damaged by time and woodpeckers; pieces of another old and damaged tree, that was previously cut by humans, are visible in one of the photos. I suspect but can in no way prove that this tree was pushed over for safety and as a marker.

The last two pictures are of a much smaller tree break that was fresh during the summer of 2008. The leaves stayed green until the whole thing was removed by humans at fall cleanup time. The break was about waist high. This tree break was across the road from the tree structure in the fourth and fifth pictures of my previous set. There is a house close by, and these structures perhaps were intended to mark it.

The broken trees point either west or south. The prevailing winds are usually from the west. There are plenty of downed trees, and arched ones, that were battered by wind, snow, and ice, some this winter. But I think the ones in the pictures show evidence of fitting into the general pattern of tree manipulation in this area.

Again, I have corrected the dates but not the times on these photos. If the time is of interest, add twelve hours.

(Edited by narrowfoot)
(Edited by narrowfoot)
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February 5th, 2010 01:33 PM
joshua megyesy nice structure!!
February 5th, 2010 02:47 PM
joshua megyesy How far is this from the nearest home?
The 3rd one down looks like it has a lot of foot traffic next to it. Are those human or wildlife tracks?
Also, are these next to trails? or are they out in the woods more?
February 5th, 2010 02:59 PM
toejam They're all close to trails. Those human tracks are from me. There's plenty of deer tracks in there as well. Alot of what looks like tracks are probably from snow and ice droppings.
February 5th, 2010 05:20 PM
msmagnolia33 In your newer find, it looks like the arch is actually interweaved into the structure. Is that correct? (My eyes are not what they used to be) If so, that is very cool. I don't believe I've ever seen one quite like it. Thanks so much for sharing !
February 24th, 2010 11:11 PM
narrowfoot I have created a new flickr.com set, showing tree arches in my observation area.

http://www.flickr.com/photos/digitaluser/sets/72157623379593075/

Since this is a harsh climate, I cannot definitely say what caused some of these arches. The first two are small, really sticks arched over. The third was curved over the road last year and was cut down by a human, see stumps in the fourth picture.

The next is an old arch, an apple tree bent over to the ground. Since the ends of the branches are now flat and even with the surface of the ground, I think they were originally stuck into the dirt to anchor the arch, but the tips have rotted away. Visible in the picture are a dirt pile and a fence, placed there by humans who also wanted to block this path! The next picture, the sixth, shows the old apple tree from the reverse side. Because they are camouflaged with brush and other vegetation, many of the tree structures in my pictures are much more visible from within the apparently protected area than from outside it. This is one of the reasons they seem to signal what lies beyond them, intended to warn from one side only.

The first four pictures on the second line of the set illustrate the evolution of an arched structure. The finished structure is shown in my first set of tree structures (see above). Going back through my photo library, I realized I have pictures of it in various stages. Note that two tall saplings were already bent over in the summer of 2008. They are more visible in the winter photo, as they were in early summer of 2009. The structure built around the lower sapling was created in midsummer of 2009. The rooted sapling used to prop the arch from the beginning is shown close up in the fourth photo, along with one side stick which fell into the notch.

The last two pictures on the second row show weaving that I don't think happened without manipulation. The first is part of a much larger structure that included large x's and arches, now damaged by winter. The second, which appeared this past fall, is much smaller and is near the very large tree break from the same time (see tree break photos linked above).

I have sought here to show arches that may have been created by something other than weather. Severe ice and snow storms over the past few months have arched some shrubs and slender cedar trees. They have not created anything like the arches in these photos.
(Edited by narrowfoot)
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March 6th, 2010 07:30 PM
narrowfoot I just noticed that my initial set of pictures on flickr.com has been viewed 1150 times. Maybe some of those who went there were googling 'tree structures' aka tree houses. If so they must have wondered what those unlabeled bunches of trees and sticks were, not to mention footprints, mushrooms, and salt shakers! :-D
March 21st, 2010 08:47 PM
narrowfoot I've added one more picture, on the third line, to my Arches and Weaving set on flickr.com:

http://www.flickr.com/photos/digitaluser/sets/72157623379593075/

This photo was taken from the opposite side of the large weaving on the previous (second) row. The large arches and x's were heavily damaged by a harsh winter a few months later. This is the best photo I have of this very large structure. Note that roads are visible in these photos, and I was standing on a trail when I took the second photo. I have never figured out what this complicated structure was all about, but it is fascinating. Remnants of it are still there.

Reminder: If you click on All Sizes above an individual photo, or play the Slideshow, you can see large versions of the photos.
May 21st, 2010 12:57 AM
narrowfoot A new set of photos from my observation area:

http://www.flickr.com/photos/digitaluser/sets/72157624104802436/

The first four are from last fall. The first picture shows sticks thrust between trees. The next three are the same group of limbs shown from different angles. The club leaning against the tree was missing by spring. The fifth picture shows a protective pile of brush behind a large structure (first picture in my original set). The sixth shows a new teepee arrangement at the end of the same structure, from the front.

On the second line, the first three pictures show trees, with tops previously sawed off, thrust upside down into a cedar thicket at the other end of the large structure. The root ends were broken off. Next are three pictures showing large tree breaks. The middle photo is the slanted tree that was broken off from the tree in the first picture.

The last four pictures were taken this spring. The large tree possibly fell during heavy winter weather, but it is propped between two trees, and so I consider it a possible structure. The likelihood of that is strengthened by the tall X associated with it.

The more I explore the area, the more details I find that surprise me and that demonstrate what I think is deliberate manipulation of the materials in the woods.
May 23rd, 2010 12:56 AM
3Raven As I was reading this...I thought back about a thread that I had just posted on under: Official BFRO Question and Answer/First expedition of the summer - possible stick structure?"

In this thread of yours, you said....

Quote:
narrowfoot wrote:
A new set of photos from my observation area:

http://www.flickr.com/photos/digitaluser/sets/72157624104802436/

The more I explore the area, the more details I find that surprise me and that demonstrate what I think is deliberate manipulation of the materials in the woods.


I find this a very good question/idea.
I agree..and that is something that I wonder about also.
In that, I wonder..could sasquatches also use.. sometimes trees that humans have cut/choped off, for their needs.
May 23rd, 2010 01:14 AM
narrowfoot Yes. If you back up to February 24, you'll find a link I posted to another set of pictures, Arches and Weaving. The last of those pictures shows a structure that contains rooted, broken, and sawed saplings. The latter were cut by humans clearing for a path. The wood cutters stacked them neatly; someone else incorporated some of them into the structure which shows weaving, arches, and x's.

In addition, the set I labeled Additional Pictures, link you referred to, contains a picture of a brush pile behind a major structure. (The structure is the first one in my original link at the top of this thread). That pile of brush contains at least one sawed off bush. This set also shows trees that had been pruned, and then were broken off and thrust into a large cedar thicket.

I see Bigfoot as an opportunist. Whatever material is around and useful may be picked up and used in these structures. I noticed the sawed logs lying across the creek from the sticks in the rocks, in your pictures. And I wondered who laid them beside the stream. Maybe you'll find out whether they'll get used for some purpose. Interesting stuff, isn't it!
May 23rd, 2010 01:34 AM
3Raven
Quote:
narrowfoot wrote:
I see Bigfoot as an opportunist. Whatever material is around and useful may be picked up and used in these structures. I noticed the sawed logs lying across the creek from the sticks in the rocks, in your pictures. And I wondered who laid them beside the stream. Maybe you'll find out whether they'll get used for some purpose. Interesting stuff, isn't it!


thank you for the info, and yes I do agree with your thoughts/ideas, that sometimes it dose seem that Sasquatches makes use of trees that humans have cut/choped off.

Only I am sorry if I maybe miss stated the other thread that I was talking about in my last post here on your thread.
I am not the writer/starter of that the other thread I was talking about, I meant only that it was one I had posted in.

May 23rd, 2010 11:26 AM
narrowfoot It was late at night, I was very tired, and I should have looked at the other thread to see who I was writing to! My apologies. . .
July 14th, 2010 03:50 AM
Amber-MO-MI I'd like to share some photos that I've taken over the past two days with all of you. I'm new to this, so any opinions/comments/questions/information that can be shared are more than welcome. There are two sets of photos that I've made. I've added captions to them in order to explain what they might be. Can't wait to hear your replies! :)

http://www.flickr.com/photos/amber32103/
July 14th, 2010 06:19 PM
narrowfoot Very interesting pictures, Amber. The tree twists and footprints and the structure made from previously cut limbs look quite suggestive to me.
July 15th, 2010 02:23 PM
narrowfoot I meant to ask, how large an area contains all of the things in these pictures? And incidentally, I have recently seen a stack of small sticks and an unbroken tree twist very like the ones you photographed.
July 15th, 2010 11:53 PM
Amber-MO-MI Thanks, narrowfoot. All of my photos are from an area about 4 to 5 acres large. The area is my backyard and it ends at a river. The tree twists are interesting to me as well, but my husband, who is very skeptical of sasquatch existence, believes the tree breaks and twists are from other trees falling on them. He has cut numerous dead trees down out there over the past 3 years. I'm not convinced that every one of the tree breaks/twists could be from a tree falling on them, however, as there are no signs of trees cut down close enough to the area.

I don't know what to make of the footprints. I've never taken pictures of or even really paid attention to tracks before, so I don't have much knowledge when it comes to deciphering what could have made them or how they were made. I'm trying not to make something out of nothing and, yet, also trying not to discount anything. Not easy to balance both. :)

The large tree structure still amazes me. I just went back out and checked on it today. Nothing appeared to have changed, but I am willing to bet that the logs and limbs that make up the tree structure could not have all naturally fallen into the positions they are in. For instance, there is a chunk of a log that has been sawed off on both ends that is wedged into a fork of the main tree. There aren't any trees near this that were cut down, so how did that sawed off log become stuck in that tree? It really makes a nice canopy for the structure and the bed of tree bark that appears to have been stripped off the trees is pretty comfy, as well. :) Out of everything I've found, this structure is what I find most difficult to see as having occurred naturally. I feel that either a human not belonging to my family has created this or a sasquatch has. I don't know of any other animal that can manipulate logs and branches in this way.

That is interesting that you've recently seen a stack of small sticks, too. Again, my husband says that he probably stacked them there when clearing the trails a little over a month ago. Is there any way that I can determine how long those sticks may have been laying there? For instance, if they have been laying there for a month, would they have grass/weeds growing up between them or moss on them, etc.?

The carrots still haven't been bothered, but with the abundance of fruit, blackberries, and an assortment of vegetables in our garden, who'd pick carrots? Lol.
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